US’ Kearney Wins World Moguls Title

first_imgKREISCHBERG, Austria — American freestyle skier Hannah Kearney won the world title in dual moguls, while Mikael Kingsbury of Canada earned the men’s gold medal on Jan. 19.It was Kearney’s 10th medal and fourth gold at a major championship. She won the world title in moguls in 2005 and two years ago, but it was her first triumph in dual moguls.“I’ve never won the dual world championships, it means a lot to me,” Kearney said. “Ten years ago, I won my first world championship gold medal. To stay at the top for ten years, I’ve got to thank my trainers, my coaches, for helping me achieve that.”Kearney defeated Justine Dufour-Lapointe in the final by 29-6 points, a day after the Canadian beat Kearney in the moguls final.“It’s great to have a next day when you are a little bit disappointed,” said the American, who has won 43 World Cup events. “It was a bit faster today and I felt stronger with every run.”Yulia Galysheva of Kazakhstan edged defending champion Chloe Dufour-Lapointe of Canada 18-17 for the bronze medal. Chloe Dufour-Lapointe was beaten by her younger sister Justine in the semifinals.Kingsbury defeated fellow Canadian Philippe Marquis 20-15 in the men’s final for his first world dual moguls gold after finishing runner-up twice.Kingsbury bounced back from losing his moguls title Jan. 18, when he was upset in the final by Anthony Benna of France.Marc-Antoine Gagnon made it a Canadian podium sweep by beating Sho Kashima of the United States in the small final.The next medal events of the freestyle skiing and snowboard worlds are the slopestyle finals for both disciplines on Jan. 21.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

South India is near Qutab Minar

first_imgThere is much more to south India than the regular idli, dosa and sambhar. The art and craft from the region, for instance, is unknown to many in the northern parts of India. Isha Utsav, a cultural festival, might just bridge that gap. The fair gives Delhi a glimpse of south Indian art, crafts and textiles. ‘The 12 day long exhibition features specially designed crafts from rural India, organic food, daily meditation sessions and live music’ said Anubhav Nath, owner, 1AQ, where the exhibition is being held. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The art, craft and textiles displayed are made from locally sourced natural materials. The product range includes eco-friendly decorative baskets, all-purpose trays, lamps, fragrances, mats, fashionable cotton and jute handbags. Rudrakash, ethnic garments and Yoga wear and T-shirts are the most popular picks. The products are eco-friendly and are made from natural and bio-degradable materials. Stone sculptures, urlis and metal crafts made out of recycled material are other top picks at this ongoing fete. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘On the first day itself, we had a footfall of 500 people. The price range of articles start from Rs 500 and go upto Rs 15,000,’ added Anubhav.The special feature of the festival is an initiative to revive the traditional south Indian foods which were lost in the last few generations.‘The idea is to promote a wholesome range of snacks, drinks and meals, which are a perfect blend of taste, nutrition and convenience. There would also be food sampling of nutritious and wholesome appams, dosas and freshly prepared herbal teas,’ said Abhinav.Another highlight is the Isha Sound and Meditation workshops wherein participants would be taught meditation for a peaceful state of being through ethereal and serene sounds. The classes will happen daily between 4 pm to 7 pm.Go catch it.DETAILAt: 1AQ, Qutab Minar Main RoundaboutOn Till: 23 January Timings: 11 am to 7 pm dailylast_img read more

Twitter Instagram promoting extreme thinness

first_imgPosts on Twitter and Instagram often promote “bonespiration” and “thinspiration” – women’s bodies featuring protruding bones and pencil-thin limbs – which encourage eating disorders such as anorexia, a study warns. Researchers from University of Exeter in the UK show that among thousands of account holders on social media, the images of protruding bones are almost exclusively posted by young women.This so-called “bonespiration” content features selfies by young women of their skeletal bodies featuring protruding collar bones, hip bones and spines in a variety of poses, researchers said. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIts purpose is to boast about a skeletal appearance and inspire others to achieve the same emaciated look, they said.The study, published in the Journal of Eating Disorders, analysed 730 images posted.It found 26 per cent of images showed hip bones, 23 per cent showed jutting ribs, and 22 per cent showed protruding collarbones. Six per cent of photographs analysed depicted the spine.Academics fear that social media has replaced the pro- anorexia websites, and are becoming an easy to access way of encouraging eating disorders, such as anorexia, researchers said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey fear efforts to ban the images would lead to others with different hashtags appearing within days.The study also found more mainstream twitter accounts such as ‘thinspiration’, which features photos of thin celebrities, also depict young people with protruding ribs collar bones and spines.Researchers also noted a small sub group of people posting skeletal images with the hashtag ‘fitspiration’, which is dedicated to inspiring supposedly healthy bodies. The sites are being used to promote extremely unhealthy body types and are increasing pressure on teenage girls to try to become extremely thin, while contributing to a distorted view of their own body, researchers said.”Anorexia and extreme weight loss is a serious social and medical problem,” said Catherine Talbot, a psychologist at the University of Exeter.”To tackle this social contagion we need to be aware of the social media platforms being used by young people – mainly girls and young women – which is encouraging extreme weight loss. This behaviour could seriously damage their psychological and physical health,” she said.”Teenagers need to be taught about positive body image in schools and we need to build resilience,” Talbot added.last_img read more