Council to negotiate with rural water customers about supplying treated water

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (2) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +2 Vote up Vote down Jim · 233 weeks ago STATE government over reach Report Reply 0 replies · active 233 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down LiveWell · 232 weeks ago So what does it take for someone out of the city limits, that is on city utilities, to tap into the treated city water line? When Mangan was in office, I was told that no one has been annexed into the system since 1999. For the quality of the water, I would think it would mean more profit to be gouging more customers.? Report Reply 0 replies · active 232 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by James Jordan, Sumner Newscow — The Wellington City Council gave city manager Roy Eckert the go ahead to negotiate with rural water customers regarding water wells and water rights, at a special city council meeting Wednesday. The city is facing a May 1 deadline to stop supplying “raw” or untreated water to rural customers. Eckert will still have to bring the deals back to the council for approval, but this gives him approval to enter into negotiations.Since the early 1950’s the city has had wells in rural areas outside the city limits. The unwritten deal was the rural customers could use water from the wells on their property that the city put in, that are also used by the city as a water supply inside the city limits. When that water is used, it goes into the city system and is treated and passed along to water customers inside the city.Wellington gets most of its water from the river and the lake, but makes use of 10-15 wells as an alternative source.At the meeting it was explained that the state’s department of health has been after the city to stop supplying untreated water to rural customers. It was a partnership that worked for the city, and until very recently the state was not pushing the city to stop even though it was against state policy.That changed recently, city attorney Mike Brown said at the meeting. He said the person who had been dealing with the city left the job, and the new person is pushing the issue.“All of a sudden KDHE is saying we can’t supply untreated water outside the city limits. Those same people could drill their own wells and drink the water, but the city can’t,” he said.Brown said the city is going to have to negotiate new deals with these residential customers. In the past there has been a trade. The people allowed the city to have a well on their property, and they got to use that water in exchange. Now the city will have to negotiate a lease with each one of them.Eckert said the city cannot allow people to have untreated water that comes from city lines, even outside the city at the site of a well. They have to be disconnected by May 1, or the city will face a fine.He said he wanted to get this done so the people in those areas would not be without water. It puts them in a bind too, he said.“We want to be fair to those customers too,” he said.The customers are aware of the situation, and there are only 10-15 of them. They have been aware that the state wanted this practice to stop for seven or eight years.The city has its next regular meeting at 6:30 on March 1, and there is a work session set for 5:30 on March 7.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more