Police preparing for flood of BTS fans as supporters set up camp

first_img Login/Register With: Fans of South Korean boy band, BTS, started setting up camp outside the FirstOntario Centre more than 24 hours before their Thursday night show. (CBC News) Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Hamilton police are making special preparations and studying strategies used by U.S. services ahead of an expected flood of fans for international boy band sensation BTS.The seven-member South Korean group, also known as Bangtan Boys, is playing three sold out shows at the FirstOntario Centre Thursday, Saturday and Sunday night and already a ragged string of more than 50 ardent supporters were setting up along York Boulevard Wednesday afternoon with plans of camping out overnight to secure prime spot on the floor.The diehard campers are hoping for first dibs on bracelets to be released Thursday morning that will denote who gets into the venue and when. Police say they’re aware of the importance of that order and believe tolerating with the overnight lineup would be better than allowing the chaos of a box-office rush. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

PRODUCERS GUILD AWARDS NOMINEES INCLUDE BLACK PANTHER CRAZY RICH ASIANS

first_img Twitter Advertisement This image shows Michelle Yeoh, from left, Henry Golding and Constance Wu in a scene from the film, Crazy Rich Asians. (Sanja Bucko/Warner Bros. Entertainment via AP) Advertisement The winner of the PGA award has often gone on to win the best picture prize at the Oscars as happened last year with The Shape of Water. It diverged, however, in the two previous years.Animated nominees included Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and Incredibles 2.Winners will be unveiled at a ceremony in Beverly Hills on Jan. 19. Advertisementcenter_img The producers behind hits Black Panther, Crazy Rich Asians, A Star Is Born and Bohemian Rhapsody are among the 10 nominees for the top prize at the Producers Guild Awards.The Producers Guild of America announced its selections Friday for its 30th installment, which also included BlacKkKlansman, The Favourite, Green Book, A Quiet Place, Roma and Vice.Notably absent from the nominees were First Man and If Beale Street Could Talk. Facebook Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

VANCOUVER MODEL SUFFERS SEVERE BURNS IN PHOTOSHOOT MISHAP

first_imgAdvertisement Robyn-Lee Jansen Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook While she didn’t know the photographer personally prior to the shoot, Jansen said he “had been vouched for” by a few other models and had “assured” her the shoot was safe.The photographer also told Jansen he “had never had a problem with fire shoots in the past.”The shoot started fine, but things took a turn for the worse when it came time to incorporate the fire element.“The photographer seemed rushed, and his family had called multiple times, as we were running a little late,” said Jansen. “He proceeded to work with fire behind me, and then yelled, ‘stand still, this part gets tricky.’”Jansen said that before she even had a chance to ask for any further explanation, “he squirted a bottle of liquid paraffin oil while standing closer to me.”The next thing Jansen knew, “I was up in flames.”She immediately managed to “drop duck and roll into a puddle and get the flames out,” but the damage was already done.Then, the photographer insisted he drive Jansen – who was in shock at this point – to the hospital himself. “In a panic, he made me wait until he was finished packing up all of his camera equipment before he would take me,” she said.Jansen said she has been left with second degree burns over 25% of her legs and first-degree burns on her anterior legs, hip, back, and right arm, as a result of the incident.Asked about a recovery timeline, Jansen told Daily Hive that doctors have given her two weeks to heal, and “if I am not almost fully healed by then, I will have to undergo skin grafts.”Following this, “if I can get into surgery right away that would be another three to four weeks.”But that estimate, she added, “doesn’t include the time it will take for the scarring and skin pigment to normalize.”Although there are no infections and doctors have told her she is healing well, Jansen said she’s been informed that “any healing done on my own after three weeks leaves an 80% chance of scarring.”The incident has also left Jansen currently unable to walk, “let alone go about my job as a model with all my wounds and extreme pain.”As a result, she has had to cancel all her paid jobs for the next “two to three months.” In addition, she said, “there is still the issue of severe scarring. All of these things will hinder my ability to model.”A warning to other modelsReflecting on the “horrible and horrific” incident, Jansen said she believes the whole situation “was caused due to negligence and recklessness on the photographer’s behalf.”She hopes that by sharing her story other models will learn from her experience, and properly vouch for their own safety prior to any photoshoot.“I know a lot of younger models are very trusting, and slow to voice their opinion,” she said. “I would like all models to be more demanding and assertive.”If the photographer – or brand – “really values” the model they’re working with, “they will happily run through all tricky situations before hand so you are sure and confident of what you are doing.”And if they don’t seem like they are willing to negotiate – or  threaten to find another model – “then that’s a red flag.”“Don’t trust other people’s words when going into a risky shoot,” she said. “Demand that there be safety procedures in place.”If the photographers can’t provide or guarantee this, she said, “then just don’t do it. It’s not worth your time and safety.”It’s a lesson Jansen had to learn the hard way, but one she says she’ll never forget.“Never again will I accept anything where I could possibly be injured again, no matter how safe the photographer says it is, or how many other models he has worked with,” she said.GoFund Me campaign createdWhile she continues to recover one day at a time, a GoFundMe page has now been created to assist Jansen with financial issues surrounding the whole situation.Seeking legal help, paying her bills, recuperating lost wages, and dealing with extra medical expenses not covered “is going to be tough especially as an international student,” she said.Robyn-Lee JansenWhile she “doesn’t usually like to ask for help,” Jansen said anything is appreciated during this “distressing” time. “I am away from all my friends and family, and my boyfriend has taken off work to take care of me.”Financial assistance “would really help go a long way for the next few months of care and recovery,” she said. “It will be a long road to recovery and I am hoping long term I won’t be left with too much scarring.”By Eric Zimmer ~ DailyHivecenter_img Story contains images some may find graphic. Discretion is advised.After what she says was one of the “one of the most traumatic and terrifying moments” of her life, a 22-year-old international student and freelance model living in Vancouver is recovering  in hospital from severe burns all over her body, after a recent photoshoot gone wrong.On June 13, Robyn-Lee Jansen responded to a freelance modelling job, “where the photographer wanted to work with fire – behind me from a distance – in order to create some awesome shots.” Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Backroom deals speeches key to AFN national chief victory

first_img(Former AFN natioal chief Matthew Coon Come (left) walks beside AFN national chief candidate Pam Palmater during the grand entry Tuesday. Coon Come, Grand Chief of the Cree, is backing Palmater in her bid. APTN/Photo)By Tim Fontaine and Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsTORONTO–With less than 24 hours until chiefs begin electing a new leader of the Assembly of First Nations, it’s make-or-break time for the eight candidates.For many chiefs in attendance, this will be their first opportunity to meet one-on-one with those vying for the position of national chief.As of Tuesday, 314 chiefs and proxies had registered for the Toronto AFN gathering, but officials said they expected more to register by tomorrow, the day of the vote. A total of 1400 people had registered to attend the gathering by Tuesday morning.There are about 634 chiefs who are eligible to vote for the national chief. The winning candidate needs to garner at least 60 per cent of the vote.Eight candidates are in the race for national chief.Four women are vying for the job, including Ellen Gabriel, a Mohawk from Kanesatake, who rose to prominence during the Oka crisis, Joan Jack, an Ojibway lawyer from the Berens River First Nation and former Treaty 3 grand chief Diane Kelly, a lawyer from Ojibways of Onigaming First Nation, and Pam Palmater, a Mi’kmaq lawyer and professor at Ryerson University.The field of candidates also includes incumbent National Chief Shawn Atleo, George Stanley, Alberta AFN regional chief from the Cree First Nation of Frog Lake, Bill Erasmus, Dene Nation chief from the Northwest Territories and Terrance Nelson, the five-time former chief of Roseau River.Much of this politicking takes place in caucus rooms. Over the next day and during the voting process, chiefs from each region will meet in these private rooms to discuss amongst themselves where each candidate stands.“Usually they’ll have an idea on who they want to vote for on the first ballot. And then after that what happens is that the candidates will go around to the various caucus rooms and find out if they can pinpoint specific items that they need to work on to gain support for that caucus. Because after the first ballot everything can change very quickly.” says John Beaucage, who ran unsuccessfully for national chief in 2009.Bob Watts,chief of staff to former AFN national chief Phil Fontaine, said each of the camps would also spend Tuesday working furiously to shore up their existing support and try to peel support away from the other candidates.“Right now it’s about shoring up votes, making sure supporters are still supporters and finding ways of networking out in the other camps and seeing where there is help and where there is no help,” he said. “There is a lot of work in the backrooms.”Perhaps the most formal and visible election event is the all-candidates forum. Traditionally held the night before voting begins, candidates have the opportunity to address the chiefs in attendance in a strictly timed and structured format.Beaucage says this will be crucial for incumbent Atleo.“They’re looking at the past record for National Chief Atleo. They’re seeing what was promised three years ago and they’re seeing how that promise was delivered and they’re trying to determine if Chief Atleo deserves another term.”Watts said speech preparation plays a big part of what is happening in the backrooms of each camp.“(Atleo) has probably gone over his speech this afternoon a hundred times to make sure that he is going to hit everything they expect of him. This is going on in all the camps,” said Watts. “This is big politics and people take it really seriously.”While it might be easy to assume that the level of applause is an indication of support, that’s not always the case. At the 2009 AFN election in Calgary, Nelson received the most applause at the all-candidates forum, yet was eliminated in the first round of voting.The speeches will be playing a decisive role in this year’s outcome as many chiefs have still to make up their minds as to who they will support. It appears Atleo has a lock on a large part if not all the B.C. votes making Ontario, which has the second largest block of chief, as a key battleground. Many Ontario chiefs say they are waiting to see how the speeches unfold before deciding where to turn.Talk among chiefs and observers indicate that if Atleo emerges from the first ballot in a show of strength, his opposition will melt away. It seems there is little appetite for the marathon voting sessions from 2009.Watts said this year’s election is probably one of the most important in recent memory.“There is a lot at stake. There is probably more at stake in this election than in any other election,” said Watts. “Just with the way things are going with free prior and informed consent, the focus on resource development, the alternative that the government seems to be presenting that, ‘we’ll go ahead and do stuff and worry about it later,’ versus First Nations saying we want processes, we want to be involved, we want high standards in terms of how things are being done. So these are contrasting visions of the country of how development will happen.”And the high stakes have brought out some of the big hitters in First Nations politics.Former AFN national chief Matthew Coon Come, who is Grand Chief of the Cree, has publicly backed Palmater’s candidacy. He walked next to her as they entered during the grand procession to open the AFN gathering amid drums and singing.Coon Come, however, refused to comment Tuesday on why he backed Palmater.Another former national chief Ovide Mercredi, who is now a band councillor for Misipawistik Cree Nation in Manitoba, has thrown his considerable influence behind Atleo.“(Atleo) is the only guy that can lead,” said Mercredi, as he walked into the Toronto Metro Convention Centre where the AFN vote will be held.This year’s election has also seen a level of criticism directed at the incumbent not usually seen in AFN contests.Palmater has strongly rebuked the work of the AFN and Atleo, accusing the incumbent national chief of being too close to the Conservative government and enabling the assimilation of First Nations people.While her blunt talk has earned her a large following on social media, some chiefs believe that she has crossed the line.Snuneymuxw Chief Doug White, whose community is on Vancouver Island, said the rhetoric employed by Palmater has been “destructive” and done little to advance the cause of First Nations people.“It is a destructive form of politics that destroys the dignity…of the AFN,” said White, who is supporting Atleo. “Throwing rocks doesn’t serve our people.”White also said he was “deeply disturbed” by Nelson and his decision to use a planned trip to Iran as part of his campaign.“It attacks the dignity of the AFN for a candidate to be sidling up to such a repressive regime,” said White. “No social movement in history has ever advanced by peddling ignorance and allying with oppressors.”Rumours have also circulated that some chiefs from the prairie regions may consider leaving the AFN if Atleo again wins the post.The Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations has openly criticized Atleo for ignoring the direction of chiefs who want the AFN to take a stronger position on enforcing treaty rights.Onion Lake Cree Nation Chief Wallace Fox has publicly accused Atleo of pushing the assimilation policies of the Conservative government. Fox nominated Atleo for national chief in 2009.FSIN vice-chief Morley Watson, however, dispelled talk of treaty chiefs walking away from the AFN if Atleo wins.“Whoever (the chiefs) decide to back, we will work with them,” said Watson.tfontaine@aptn.cajbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

Athabasca Fort Chipewyan FN hopes constitutional challenge on Shell project sets precedent

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Athabasca Fort Chipewyan First Nation has filed a constitutional challenge against a Shell Oil project in the tar sands region of northern Alberta.The ACFN says the federal and provincial governments failed to uphold their treaty promises to consult on large scale industrial projects and to protect hunting rights.The First Nation says they hope to set new precedents within Canadian law.Eriel Deranger, spokesperson for ACFN, spoke with APTN about the challenge.last_img

PMO downplayed rich Inuit link to discovered Franklin ship

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe Franklin expedition ship found by researchers on the Arctic seabed has a detailed and colourful history within Inuit oral tradition, yet the Inuit garnered only one 17-word sentence among the press releases and backgrounders released by the Prime Minister’s Office at the time after Tuesday’s announced discovery.An analysis of ice patterns and movements reveals the wreck was likely pushed from the area where Inuit said they initially found the ship to where Canadian researchers discovered it over a century later, said Tom Zagon, a research scientist with the Canadian Ice Service.“We can see the natural drift of ice actually occurs and supports the Inuit oral history,” said Zagon, during a press conference Wednesday.Ryan Harris, the Parks Canada marine archeologist who led the ship’s search, said both Franklin ships, HMS Terror and HMS Erebus, appear in the oral tradition. The Inuit, however, provided a more detailed description of one ship said to have been found south of King William Island off Grant Point on the Adelaide Peninsula in an area known as Ootloo-lik “the place of the bearded seal.”Harris said this was the shipwreck discovered by his search team.“The information that was gleaned from the Inuit with respect to that second, southern vessel is far more detailed and nuanced,” he said. “For that reason, we, like previous searchers, started in the south in the belief that the information was a bit more informative and it’s quite detailed with reports of the vessel there when it was first identified by the Inuit. They were ultimately able to visit the ship and obtained useful material from the ship.”Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced the discovery of the submerged shipwreck Tuesday. The hunt for the Franklin ships, which were last seen by European eyes in 1845, has been a priority for the Harper government. Parks Canada led six searches for the ships since 2008.Yet, the general public wouldn’t know about the key role Inuit oral history played in the selection of the search area by reading the information posted on the PMO’s website. There, the role of the Inuit in the Franklin saga is mentioned only in passing.“Indeed, except for some encounters with the Inuit, the crews of the vessels were never seen again,” said the historical backgrounder on the PMO’s website, which is also available in the Inuit language of Inuktitut.The PMO did not respond to an APTN National News question on why the Inuit received barely a mention.According to the historical record, the Inuit provided several detailed accounts of their encounter with the wrecked ship south of King William Island to 19th Century and early 20th Century explorers who went searching for the ill-fated Franklin expedition and its two lost ships. It’s unknown which of the two ships was found south of the island.In Dorothy Harley Eber’s book, Encounters on the Passage; Inuit meet the Explorers, one of the most detailed accounts of the location of the wrecked ship south of King William Island was given to American journalist William Henry Gilder who accompanied American explorer Frederick Schwatka on his 1878 search of the Franklin expedition.Gilder reported the team managed to interview a man named Ikinnelikpatolok who had been to a ship trapped in the sea ice.“The next white man he saw was dead in a bunk of a big ship which was frozen near an island about five miles due west of Grant Point, on Adelaide Peninsula. They had to walk about three miles on smooth ice to reach the ship…About this time he saw the tracks of white men on the mainland. When he first saw them there were four and afterward only three. This was when the spring snows were falling,” reported Gilder, who is quoted in Eber’s 2008 book. “When his people saw the ship so long without anyone around they used to go on board and steal pieces of wood and iron. They did not know how to get inside by the doors and cut a hole in the side of the ship, on a level with the ice, so that when the ice broke-up during the following summer the ship filled and sunk.”A similar story was told by the Inuit of the Boothia Peninsula to British naval officer Leopold McClintock in 1859. McClintock led a search for the lost Franklin ships and crew funded by Sir John Franklin’s widow Lady Jane Franklin.“After much anxious enquiry we learned that two ships had been seen by the natives of King William Island; one of these was seen to sink in deep water and nothing was obtained from her…but the other was forced on shore by the ice where they suppose she still remains, but is much broken,” reported McClintock, according to Eber’s book. “And Ootloo-lik is the name of the place where she grounded…The latter also told that the body of a man was found on board the ship, that he must have been a very large man and had long teeth.”McClintock, however, thought Ootloo-lik was on the west coast of King William Island, wrote Eber, while the area was later thought to be south of the island. Eber said successive interpretations placed the area on O’Reilly Island and on Grant Point.In 1969, L. A. Learmoth, a Hudson Bay Company trader who knew Inuktitut, wrote in the spring issue of The Beaver that the area was actually a large swath of territory where Inuit regularly hunted for bearded seal, wrote Eber. The area extended south from King William Island, down to the Adelaide Peninsula, west to Jenny Lind Island and to the coast of the Queen Maud Gulf, wrote Eber.“This represents quite a stretch of water intermixed with dozens and dozens of small islands which makes it very tricky to survey and all essentially uncharted, though we have made significant inroads,” said Harris.Another explorer who searched for the remains of Franklin’s ship and crew, American Charles Hall, also heard a similar story. Hall went to King William Island in 1864 and spoke to Inuit from the Boothia Peninsula who told him they had been on a stranded ship.“A native of the island first saw the ship when sealing; it was far off seaward, in the ice. He concluded to make his way to it, though at first he felt afraid, got aboard, but saw no one, although from every appearance somebody had been living there. At last he ventured to steal a knife and made off as fast as he could to his home. But on showing the (Inuit) what he had stolen the men of the place all started off for the ship. To get into the (cabin) they knocked a hole through because it was locked. They found there a dead man whose body was very large and heavy, his teeth very long,” reported Hall, according to Eber’s book. “They said they had made a hole in the bottom by getting out one of the timbers or planks. The ship was afterwards much broken up by the ice, and the masts, timbers, boxes, casks, etc., drifted to shore…The (Inuit) saw that nearly the whole side of one side of the vessel had been crushed in by the heavy ice.”Eber wrote that Inuit gave accounts they boarded the ship to five 19th Century and early 20th Century explorers searching for Franklin and his. Three of the accounts claimed the Inuit made a hole in the hull and the ship sunk, Eber wrote.Harris said it would have been difficult for the Inuit at the time to break through the hull, which was 36 inches thick and comprised of layered wood.As for the second ship, the accounts on this one are sparse. It seems, according to Inuit accounts, the second ship ended up east of King William Island near Matty Island, according to Eber.Eber said in an interview with APTN National News the stories of the Franklin ship are still circulating and it’s worthwhile to sift through them for clues.“The difficulty with these stories is that they eventually begin to be not second-hand stories or third or fourth-hand stories, but really old stories that are pretty difficult to check out. But they can be checked out physically and pay off,” she said. “We do learn things from them.”During her research for the book, Eber came across one story that led her to believe part of the ill-fated Franklin expedition’s tale may never be known.Two Inuit from Nunavut’s Kitikmeot region told her a story handed down from grandfather to grandfather.“This great-great grandfather went hunting caribou east of Chantrey Inlet about (240 kilometres) south of Gjoa Haven (Nunavut) and he saw an inuksuk he hadn’t seen before. He decided to go and investigate and in this cairn was a lot of white and brownish-coloured material wrapped in a leather pouch that was paper for sure. There were a lot of strange markings. That’s writing. They were brownish coloured papers, not dark brown but light brown. He figure these papers were cursed by a spirit who had left them there and he took them and destroyed every last one of them,” wrote Eber, quoting Tommy Anguttitauruq who heard the story from Matthew Tiringaneak who heard it from his grandfather.“What mysteries might have been solved by those brown-coloured papers?” wrote Eber.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Hundreds march on state capital Bismarck to have their say about the

first_imgTom Fennario APTN National NewsAfter a turbulent weekend in North Dakota over the Dakota Access pipeline, water protectors took their message straight to the capital Monday.Hundreds of supporters joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and marched on Bismarck.tfennario@aptn.caFollow @tfennariolast_img

Technology gives a face to mother of baby found dead in Calgary

first_imgThe Canadian PressPolice have released a high-tech image they say is a likeness of the mother of a baby girl found dead in a dumpster on Christmas Eve.They have also released a composite sketch of the baby.Police say the mother’s image was produced by a company in Virginia that specializes in DNA phenotyping, which can predict physical appearance and ancestry from unidentified DNA.It’s the first time Calgary police have used the technology.“They have had success in the United States,” Staff Sgt. Martin Schiavetta of the homicide unit said Wednesday. “This technique actually has been publicly utilized in Canada twice already in Ontario – in Windsor and Sudbury.”Police said they received numerous tips after the baby was found in the northwest community of Bowness, but all were investigated and ruled out.“We have exhausted all other investigative inquiries,” said Schiavetta. “We are really at an investigative standstill.”As part of that investigation, police found biological material at the scene that they sent in for the DNA phenotyping.The results indicate that the mother is likely to be of mixed race – possibly Indigenous – with fair skin. Her hair is described as dark, probably brown or black, and her eyes are hazel that may also appear green.Schiavetta said the technology cannot predict age, weight, height or hairstyle.“This is a scientific approximation and obviously a mother’s – or anyone’s – physical appearance can change,” he said. “Concentrate on the hair colour, the eye colour and the ethnicity.”Schiavetta said investigators hope the image will lead to tips that help find the mother.An autopsy showed the baby was breathing on her own at some point after being born.Police said identifying the mother will help determine what led to the baby being placed in the dumpster. They still don’t know whether the death is suspicious, so the mother is not being sought as a suspect.“We have some really difficult and challenging questions to ask the mother, but please do not assume that the mother placed the baby there,” said Schiavetta.Anyone who may know the identity of the woman in the Calgary case is asked to call the homicide tip line at 403-428-8877 or the Calgary Police Service at 403-266-1234.Another Canadian case where the same technology was used in 2017 was the homicide of Renee Sweeney in Sudbury, Ont. The case has stymied police since 1998 when she was repeatedly stabbed behind the counter of the adults-only video store where she worked.In Windsor, Ont., police used the technology in the 1971 murder of a six-year-old girl named Ljubica Topic. She was playing outside her home with her older brother when a man approached the pair and offered her money to come with him. Her body was found nearby four hours later.Both cases remain unsolved.The company, Parabon Nanolabs, said on its website that the images from the DNA profile have helped in several U.S. cases – including police arresting and charging a Baltimore resident with murder in January for the 2017 death of his girlfriend.A Texas man confessed to murder in November 2017 after police released an image matching his description.The technology also helped identify and convict a North Carolina man who gunned down a couple in their home in 2012.last_img read more

Video shows argument between Wolastoqew student and St Thomas University administrator over

first_imgKeyaira Gruben and her daughter Cedar. Gruben filed a human rights complaint against St. Thomas University. Photo: Angel Moore/APTNAngel MooreAPTN NewsKeyaira Gruben never expected that protecting her rights as an Indigenous student at university would lead to an argument in the classroom with the social work program coordinator.“That this is really sad that this is how this issue comes to light when it should have been brought into light and addressed a long time ago and instead it was addressed in this manner which was not professional,” Gruben told APTN News.Gruben has been in a battle with St. Thomas University since she started the Mi’kmaq Maliseet social work program two years ago.She said she has right to bring her baby to class.The university disagrees.Gruben filed a human rights complaint against the university in October 2018.She said the video shows what’s really going on.“The fact that something like this which displays a quite different reality than what they’ve been portraying it doesn’t leave me surprised one bit that they would be trying to deny or distort or discredit the evidence in front of them,” she said.Watch Angel’s story about Keyaira Gruben here.  The video shows a confrontation between Gruben and the coordinator in front of other students in the class.The coordinator is clearly upset that Gruben went public with her complaints.At times both voices are raised.The coordinator tells Gruben if she doesn’t like the way the program is run she can leave.Along with being a student, and mother, Gruben is also a band councillor of Kingsclear First Nation.She has the support from her community.Chief Gabriel Atwin said that after watching the video, it’s clear St. Thomas is not supporting Indigenous students to succeed.“Talking to Keyaira in a condescending I would say way unfortunately us as Indigenous people have gone through so much,” he said.When Gruben applied for the program two years ago, she heard that it was child friendly.“So I just assumed I’d be able to attend the program with my child,” she said.“I also have other friends who have gone through the cohort and they had their young infants and toddlers with them through the whole program.”When classes started in October 2017, there was already another infant in the classroom.“It felt very communal like there was a lot of maternal love that i felt in the program from a lot of the different women and they all connected with the babies for the most part,” Gruben said.But a few months later, people complained that the infants were disruptive.There was no baby policy in place and a solution could not be reached.(Jeffrey Carleton says the university won’t be reviewing video of confrontation between Gruben and administrator. Photo: Angel Moore/APTN)Jeffrey Carleton, spokesperson for the university said accommodations were made.“St. Thomas has been known as an accommodating place for mothers and nursing mothers,” he said.“And for many years professors individually would deal with issues if it arose in the classroom and make accommodations for students.”A separate room was designated for the mothers and babies and a policy was developed – allowing babies in the classroom only to be breastfed or in emergency situations.“In the additional room we added internet and Skype so that the nursing mothers could continue their studies while the class was going on if their child was being disruptive,” said Carleton.Brandy Stanovich, the interim president of the Indigenous Women’s Association of the Wabanaki Territories, said children are medicine and St. Thomas has an obligation to honour mothers and children.“They need to support our traditional roles and help revive our culture and not put up blockers like that,” she said.(Brandy Stanovich, the interim president of the Indigenous Women’s Association of the Wabanaki Territories. Photo: Angel Moore/APTN)Gruben said the separate baby room compromised her education.She tried to appeal the decision, but her efforts made no difference.“I got an email from the director of the social work program stating that if any child was brought to class that the teachers would stop teaching,” said Gruben.“So I said perfect this would be a good opportunity for me, us to finally have a talking circle then and she replied that there would be no talking circle.”The next day, Gruben was in the baby room, when the program coordinator called her into the class.An argument ensued and was recorded on video.Soon after she received a letter from the university saying if she didn’t comply with their new baby policy she could be withdrawn from the program.Carleton said he hasn’t seen the video and won’t look into it.”I didn’t know about the video but what’s positive about going to human rights route is that there is very specific language and requirements set down by the New Brunswick human rights commission by which the student’s complaint will be measured by.Gruben said she’s not surprised the university is ignoring the video.“That’s really how privilege works, they get to pick and choose what they share, what they don’t share, what they erase and what they minimize,” she said.“And that’s what these colonial institutions have always done to indigenous voices.Keyaira Gruben talks about why she got in the program and whether it met her expectations Atwin said the video needs to be investigated.“I believe it was very unprofessional and it needs to be investigated.Gruben is waiting on the decision from the New Brunswick Human Rights Commission.She has one year left in her program.Her daughter Cedar now goes to daycare.Amoore@aptn.ca@angelharksenlast_img read more

Child advocates call for a national youth suicide prevention strategy

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsA national organization representing children and youth in Canada is calling on governments to address the number of youth suicides in the country.Death by suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people in Canada.The Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates (CCCYA) say not enough is being done to combat the problem.“We can no longer tolerate the inaction of federal, provincial and territorial governments,” Del Graff, the Child and Youth Advocate for Alberta, told reporters Tuesday.“The fact that we’re the only G7 country without a national strategy is telling. The fact that we don’t have a national children’s commissioner in Canada is telling. That fact that we don’t even have a mechanism for complaints about children who have human violations is telling,” he said.“As Canadians we ought to be able to demand more.”The group released a new study on youth suicide at its national conference in Winnipeg.In it they put forward three recommendations for the federal government.“We call on the government of Canada to develop and implement a fully resourced, national suicide prevention strategy for Canada with designated funding to the provinces and territories to create their own or to support existing strategies where applicable,” said Jackie Lake Kavanagh, the Child and Youth Advocate for Newfoundland and Labrador.The CCCYA says national data on suicides and attempted suicides is lacking.The second recommendation calls on Canada to develop and implement a cross-jurisdictional data system and to compel provinces to mandatory report attempted and completed suicides.“The current landscape on suicide statistics in Canada is fraught with under reporting and inconsistency across jurisdictions,” said Lake Kavanagh.“This is especially true when it comes to data collection on Indigenous youth suicide.”There are no recent data examining rates of suicide among Indigenous youth but recent numbers from Statistics Canada show the suicide rate among First Nations people was three times higher than non-Indigenous from 2011-2016.For Metis it’s two times higher and for Inuit its approximately nine times higher.How many youth who are in care when they die by suicide is also not known.But Graff says there is a direct link between the child welfare system and mental health.“Many of the young people, if not all of the young people, within the child welfare system have experienced some levels of trauma and trauma is an indicator that, in fact, they are going to need to have those additional supports,” said Graff.“When those supports are not adequately provided we see issues like addictions, mental health concerns, suicide.”Daphne Penrose’s office tracks the number of child deaths and the circumstances around them in Manitoba.She is the Advocate for Children and Youth in the province.From 2017-2018, 20 youth died by suicide. Four were in care at the time of their death.Penrose said while the child welfare system does play a role, access to mental health resources for all youth is the main issue.“This is a problem with respect to mental health and wellness of children and the ability for children who are struggling to be able to reach out,” she said.“There are many kids in this situation who are not involved in the child welfare system.”Lastly, The CCCYA recommends governments work with Indigenous youth and leadership to develop plans that will reflect what is needed in each community.The Canada Suicide Prevention Service enables callers anywhere in Canada to access crisis support using the technology of their choice (phone, text or chat), in French or English:Phone: toll-free 1-833-456-4566, Text: 45645, Chat: crisisservicescanada.cabhobson@aptn.ca@bhobs22last_img read more

Forestry forum tries to find solutions to a struggling industry

first_imgLee WilsonAPTN NewsThere was a not a seat left at the “Rethinking Forestry Forum” held in Terrace, British Columbia in hopes of finding long-term solutions to the economic downtown that has rocked the industry.This year more than 4,000 forestry workers have lost their jobs according to the province.Eighty-five per cent of First Nations in the province have signed forest consultation and revenue sharing agreements, and the downturn is also affecting these nations.Roger Keery, president of Skeena Sawmills, was pleased to see industry focus their energy to find solutions to improve forestry.“There is an enormous amount of experience of people in the forest industry,” said Keery. “It’s common to have people who have worked in this for 30 plus years who have tried a lot of things and seen these problems and wrestled with them.”The northern terrain itself creates challenges.Building roads through coastal mountains is costly and tree growth is slower than in southern regions.“The value of the fibre here is on average lower than in some other parts of the province and the logging costs are high,” Keery said.“Those are some of the historic issues for logging in this area”.The forum was arranged by Skeena MLA Ellis Ross after residents shared job concerns with mill closures happening around the rest of the province.“This is really bad what’s happening in B.C., 89 mills either closed or curtailed.“I don’t want to see that, there has got to be a long term solution to this”, said Ross.Another challenge is high stumpage fees which are what industry pays the government to harvest timber on Crown lands.Those fees make it harder to be competitive in the market. An idea shared here was stumpage fees applied on average over multiple permits rather than each permit having a separate fee.The industry is also in search of new markets.Terrace Resident Chayo Nyawello has been trying to reach a deal to sell timber to Africa.He put together a plan that was approved by federal and provincial governments.“In the last two years, the year before I travelled to Africa to Ethiopia and Sudan. I looked around and I saw the opportunity in those countries as a new market for Canadian wood products,” said Nyawello.In Ethiopia, he discussed with government officials the benefit of building homes with Canadian lumber.“My meeting was very good with him. He said go into the community look for the construction companies and sell your ideas to them – that building with wood and wood housings are the best”, he said.Ross says MLAs are looking at how other wood producing countries like Sweden have built a sustainable and profitable forestry industry.“Are we at year one of BC having a 30-year plan for forestry, I am hopeful we can get to that conversation and make it more sustainable”In late September, loggers staged a rally in downtown Vancouver. They drove their trucks through the downtown to raise awareness of the struggles the industry is facing.lwilson@aptn.calast_img read more

China orders North Korean business closed under UN sanctions

first_imgBEIJING, China – China on Thursday ordered North Korean-owned businesses to close, cutting foreign revenue for the isolated North under U.N. sanctions imposed over its nuclear and missile programs.China is North Korea’s main trading partner, making Beijing’s co-operation essential to the success of sanctions aimed at stopping the North’s pursuit of weapons technology. China, long North Korea’s diplomatic protector, has gone along with the latest penalties out of growing frustration with leader Kim Jong Un’s government.North Korean businesses and ventures with Chinese partners must close within 120 days of the U.N. Security Council’s Sept. 11 approval of the latest sanctions, according to the Ministry of Commerce. That would be early January.North Korean companies operate restaurants and other ventures in China, helping to provide the North with foreign currency. North Korean labourers work in Chinese factories and other businesses.Also Thursday, China’s foreign ministry appealed for dialogue to defuse the increasingly acrimonious dispute between U.S. President Donald Trump’s government and North Korea.“The Korean Peninsula nuclear issue is related to regional peace and stability,” ministry spokesman Lu Kang said. “Breaking the deadlock requires all relevant parties to show their sincerity.”China, one of five permanent Security Council members with veto power, supports the latest sanctions but doesn’t want to push North Korea too hard for fear Kim’s government might collapse.Chinese leaders argue against doing anything that might hurt ordinary North Koreans. They agreed to the latest sanctions after the United States toned down a proposal for a total ban on oil exports to the North.Chinese officials complain their country bears the cost of enforcing sanctions, which have hurt businesses in its northeast that trade with the North.The latest round of U.N. sanctions bans member countries from operating joint ventures with North Korea, most of which are in China.They also ban sales of natural gas to North Korea and purchases of the North’s textile exports, another key revenue source. They order other nations to limit fuel supplies to the North.China, which provides the bulk of North Korea’s energy supplies, announced Saturday it would cut off gas and limit shipments of refined petroleum products, effective Jan. 1. It made no mention of crude oil, which makes up the bulk of Chinese energy supplies to North Korea and is not covered by the U.N. sanctions.China also has banned imports of North Korean coal, iron and lead ore, and seafood since early September.On Thursday, the Ministry of Commerce defended its recent imports of North Korean coal, saying they were permitted by U.N. sanctions.A ministry spokesman, Gao Feng, said imports that were reported in August trade data were allowed by a “grace period” for goods that arrived before the U.N. ban took effect.The imports are “in line with the (U.N.) resolution,” Gao said.last_img read more

HBC RioCan joint venture explores sale of downtown Vancouver property

first_imgTORONTO – A joint venture between Hudson’s Bay Co. and RioCan Real Estate Investment trust says it may sell its downtown Vancouver property.RioCan-HBC JV says in a statement that it’s engaged with CBRE and Brookfield Financial Real Estate Group to explore a sale.The Granville Street property is currently occupied by a Hudson’s Bay department store, which has a long-term lease.Interim CEO Richard Baker says any sale would include the continued operation of the store.The joint venture also says it expects to close on a $200-million mortgage on the property and the proceeds will be distributed proportionally to its partners.The joint venture owns or controls 10 flagship properties in Canada.last_img

The Competition Bureau reaches settlement with Leons and the Brick

first_imgOTTAWA – The Competition Bureau said Tuesday it has reached an agreement with Leon’s Furniture Ltd. and the Brick Ltd. regarding allegations of deceptive marketing practices dating back nearly five years ago.As part of the settlement, Leon’s and the Brick have agreed to each donate $750,000 worth of home furnishings over two years to charities to be approved by the regulator.The bureau alleged in July 2013 that the retailers’ “buy now, pay later” promotions, often resulted in customers paying more than advertised and should be stopped.It said that customers who chose the deferred-payment option often ended up paying more than those who paid for their purchases up front as a result of the additional fees, which were “buried” by the retailers in the “fine print.” The extra costs ranged from processing or administrative fees, delivery fees and taxes.Leon’s, which owns the Brick, defended its deferred payment plans at the time. The retailer of furniture, appliances and electronics said they benefited consumers.But as part of the agreement announced Tuesday, Leon’s and the Brick have also agreed to adhere to the bureau’s guidance on the proper use of disclaimers in advertising and the disclosure of fees associated with their financing plans.“Consumers expect and deserve truth in advertising,” said Josephine Palumbo, the bureau’s deputy commissioner of competition, in a statement.“The bureau works to ensure Canadians can trust advertising claims made by businesses and can be confident in their purchasing decisions. Increased competition in the marketplace provides consumers with competitive prices and more choice.”Leon’s could not be immediately reached for comment about its settlement agreement with the Competition Bureau.Companies in this story: (TSX:LNF)last_img read more

AltaGas appoints CEO to replace David Harris after sudden resignation in July

first_imgCalgary-based utility AltaGas Ltd. is appointing Randy Crawford as CEO four months after the sudden resignation of ex-CEO David Harris following an unspecified “complaint” to its board.In a news release, it says Crawford will take the reins on Dec. 10 from interim co-CEOs David Cornhill and Phillip Knoll, its chairman and a member of the board, respectively.AltaGas says Crawford has 30 years of experience in the natural gas industry and was most recently the president of midstream and commercial with EQT Corp., a U.S. gas company, where he led a growth strategy in the Marcellus natural gas fields in the northeastern U.S.It says the new CEO will be asked to strengthen AltaGas’ financial position, as well as focus on growth and new opportunities in its gas and U.S. utilities segments.The company said in July the complaint regarding Harris was not related to AltaGas’ strategy, operations or financial reporting, but hasn’t explained what it was related to or who made the complaint, nor has it given any detail of a review of the complaint it said it would undertake.Harris, who had been with AltaGas since 2010 and its top executive since April 2016, oversaw the company’s $6-billion deal to buy Washington, D.C.-based energy utility company WGL Holdings, Inc., which closed three weeks before his departure. Companies in this story: (TSX:ALA)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Transcontinentals Q4 results tops expectations shares surge higher

first_imgThe Canadian Press MONTREAL — Shares in Transcontinental Inc. shot higher after the company reported a fourth quarter that topped expectations for both profits and revenue.Shares in the Montreal-based company were up $1.40 or more than seven per cent at $20.77 midday on the Toronto Stock Exchange after going as high as $22.42.Transcontinental reported a profit of $67 million or 76 cents per share for the quarter ended Oct. 28, down from $73.4 billion or 95 cents per share a year ago.On an adjusted basis, Transcontinental says it earned 99 cents per share for the quarter, up from 91 cents per share in the same quarter a year ago.Revenue for what was the company’s fourth quarter totalled $829.2 million, up from $527.2 million, boosted by its acquisition of Coveris Americas earlier this year.Analysts on average had expected an adjusted profit of 76 cents per share and revenue of $777.2 million, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon. Companies in this story: (TSX:TCL.A, TSX:TCL.B)last_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (13,935.44, down 206.33 points). The Canadian Press Companies reporting major news:The Stars Group Inc. (TSX:TSGI). Up $1.51 or 7.25 per cent to $22.34. Shares of the online gaming company surged Friday after it announced that the Kentucky Court of Appeals has reversed a US$870-million lower court ruling against the online gaming company. It says Kentucky residents had sued PokerStars in 2010, about four years before The Stars Group bought the site, for gambling losses under a centuries-old statue. The Stars Group says it plans to seek the release of a US$100-million bond posted during the appeals process.Bombardier Inc. — Mitsubishi Aircraft Corp. is seeking the dismissal of a lawsuit by Bombardier Inc., calling the allegations of trade secret misappropriations “baseless and without merit.” The Japanese jet maker filed a motion to dismiss Bombardier’s case in a U.S. federal court in Seattle, saying the lawsuit aims to “disrupt development” of a rival jet. Bombardier sued Mitsubishi in October over allegations that some of the Quebec company’s former employees passed on documents containing trade secrets to Mitsubishi before going to work for the company.MEG Energy Corp. (TSX:MEG). Down 34 cents, or 4.38 per cent to $7.43. MEG Energy says it will waive its shareholder rights plan in its fight against a hostile takeover offer by Husky Energy Inc. However, the company says it continues to unanimously recommend shareholders reject Husky’s cash-and-share offer. MEG noted that since Husky announced its intention to make its offer on Sept. 30, Husky’s share price has fallen more than 30 per cent, eroding the value of the offer. The takeover was worth about $3.3 billion when proposed in September but has fallen to less than $2.5 billion because of deterioration in Husky’s share price.center_img Enbridge Inc. (TSX:ENB). Energy. Up three cents, or 0.07 per cent, to $41.92, on 21.4 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Industrials. Down five cents, or 2.55 per cent to $1.91 on 19.9 million shares.Manulife Financial Corp. (TSX:MFC). Down 83 cents, or 4.27 per cent, to $18.62 on 19 million shares.Kinross Gold Corp. (TSX:K). Gold. Up one cent, or 0.24 per cent, to $4.22 on 18.9 million shares.Trican Well Service Ltd. (TSX:TCW). Energy. Down two cents, or 1.9 per cent, to $1.03 on 16.2 million shares.Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ). Energy. Down 81 cents or 2.5 per cent, to $31.59 on 13.6 million shares.last_img read more

Aquaman outswims Poppins Bumblebee with 674M debut

first_imgNEW YORK — In a flood of new releases, “Aquaman” easily swam past “Mary Poppins Returns” and “Bumblebee” to lead the busy pre-Christmas weekend with an estimated $67.4 million over the weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.Without a “Star Wars” film on the December schedule for the first time in four years, a crowded slate of films sought to capitalize on the lucrative holiday period in theatres.The DC Comics superhero film “Aquaman,” which cost Warner Bros. $200 million to make, arrived already a juggernaut overseas, where it has grossed more than $400 million in three weeks of release. Including advance previews, the Jason Momoa-led “Aquaman” reeled in $72.1 million in U.S. and Canada theatres, bringing its global total to $482.8 million.“Aquaman,” directed by James Wan, has proven to be a stabilizing “Justice League” spinoff for Warner Bros. following bumpier DC releases outside of “Wonder Woman.” The film garnered an A-minus Cinemascore from audiences.For the studios, the weekend was as much about setting themselves up for Christmas to New Year’s, when theatres are routinely packed through the week. With Christmas falling on a Tuesday, studio executives said the weekend was an unpredictable and distraction-filled one, competing with some of the busiest shopping days of the year.“We really kick off starting Tuesday,” said Warner Bros. distribution chief Jeff Goldstein, who said the “Aquaman” performance came in just above the studio’s $65 million forecast. “With kids not really returning to school until January 7, this aligns the stars for us in a really positive way.”Returns were more modest for Disney’s “Mary Poppins” sequel and Paramount’s “Transformers” spinoff, though each had reason to expect strong business through the holidays.“Mary Poppins Returns,” starring Emily Blunt and directed by Rob Marshall, debuted with $22.2 million over the weekend and $31 million since opening Wednesday. That was on the low side of expectations for the musical, which cost $130 million to make.“May Poppins Returns,” which co-stars Lin-Manuel Miranda, will depend heavily on legs through the holiday season. On its side are good if not spectacular reviews (77 per cent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes), an A-minus CinemaScore from moviegoers and four Golden Globe nominations.“It’s a great weekend to start yourself off on a launch pad into the holiday period,” said Cathleen Taff, head of distribution for Disney. “We’re looking forward to great word of mouth building over the next few weeks. And we’re looking forward to a long run.”“Poppins” still narrowly edged “Bumblebee,” which opened with $21 million. That, too, is a soft beginning for a film that cost about $135 million to make after tax credits. It’s also far off the pace of the “Transformers” films, the last of which (“Transformers: The Last Knight”) debuted with $44.7 million in summer 2017.But “Bumblebee,” a “Transformers” prequel directed by Travis Knight and starring Hailee Steinfeld, has something the Michael Bay films never had: good reviews. “Bumblebee” was the weekend’s most acclaimed new wide release with a 94 per cent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Audiences also gave it an A-minus CinemaScore.“The pre-Christmas preoccupation for moviegoers affected everyone. All movies were impacted slightly by that,” said Kyle Davies, head of distribution for Paramount. “It doesn’t concern me. We played really well with great reactions. The game plan has always been that we’re now starting that play period where people go multiple times over the next few weeks, and that’s the whole point.”“To me, this weekend was a dress rehearsal for the big push that starts Christmas Day,” added Davies.Also in the mix is Sony’s well-reviewed “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” which slid to fourth in its second week with $16.7 million in ticket sales. The film also made one of the best debuts for an animated release in China where it was no. 1, grossing $26.1 million over the weekend.Clint Eastwood’s “The Mule” added $9.3 million in its sophomore frame, bringing its two-week total to $35 million. Bradley Cooper, who co-stars in “The Mule,” could also celebrate his “A Star Is Born” crossing $200 million domestically.Largely overlooked in the onslaught at theatres was STXfilms’ “Second Act,” starring Jennifer Lopez. The romantic comedy debuted with an estimated $6.5 million in 2,607 locations, drawing an audience that was 70 per cent female.But the weekend’s real flop was “Welcome to Marwen,” the Robert Zemeckis-directed fantastical drama starring Steve Carell as an imaginative man whose scale model town helps him rehabilitate after a trauma. The film, which cost at least $40 million to make, earned just $2.3 million in 1,900 theatres. It’s the second straight flop for Universal (which teamed with DreamWorks for “Marwen”) following “Mortal Engines.” That $100 million film debuted last weekend with $7.5 million film in ticket sales.Yet the weekend managed to nearly equal the box office of the same weekend last year when “The Last Jedi” was in its second week of release and “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” opened. Ticket sales for the “Star Wars”-less weekend were down a mere 2.1 per cent, according to Comscore.Year to date, the domestic box office is up 7.5 per cent and was expected to just eke past 2016’s record $11.38 billion sometime late Sunday or early Monday, said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Comscore.“The collective and cumulative strength of these newcomers, particularly ‘Aquaman,’ and a huge slate of holdovers gave us a stronger weekend than anyone imagined,” Dergarabedian said. “A superhero movie in December can make up for not having a ‘Star Wars’ movie in December.”Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theatres (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to Comscore:1. “Aquaman,” $67.4 million.2. “Mary Poppins Returns,” $22.2 million.3. “Bumblebee,” $21 million.4. “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” $16.7 million.5. “The Mule,” $9.3 million.6. “The Grinch,” $8.2 million.7. “Second Act,” $6.5 million.8. “Ralph Breaks the Internet,” $4.6 million.9. “Welcome to Marwen,” $2.4 million.10. “Mary Queen of Scots,” $2.2 million.___Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAPJake Coyle, The Associated Presslast_img read more

New joint report finds high degree of support from First Nations to

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. — A new report that was conducted by both the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources and the First Nations LNG Alliance finds First Nations have a “high degree of support” for the development of an LNG export industry in B.C.The joint report from the First Nations NGO and the Ministry stems from regional engagement sessions that the two organizations hosted last fall. “In fact, many First Nations representatives raised the need to push the remaining projects over the finish line,” adds the report.“We’re releasing the report to show that there is strong and real First Nations support for LNG development in BC,” said Alliance CEO Karen Ogen-Toews. “That means, by definition, responsible development that balances economics and the environment, and respects First Nations rights and title.”According to the report, which was released earlier this week, the issue of poverty and the need for economic and employment opportunities for First Nations was raised on a consistent basis. It adds that many First Nations view LNG projects as an important opportunity to improve poor socio-economic conditions in their communities. “If LNG projects are done in a way that respects First Nation interests, they will be the most safe, environmentally rigorous, and human-rights-compliant projects in the world,” the report added.The report makes four key recommendations that should be implemented by the provincial government: developing an Indigenous labour market strategy to support LNG projects; supporting agreements and mitigate negative impacts of cancellations on First Nations; engaging First Nations on regulatory improvements; and partnering with First Nations during engagement with the LNG industry.“What we really need is for communication and dialogue to continue and to be strengthened,” said Ogen-Toews. “Too many people have been told that First Nations oppose LNG development. That’s not true. Others believe that LNG development is automatically a negative. That’s not true either. As the report points out, many First Nations see LNG projects as a source of jobs and training and careers, and a way to improve poor socio-economic conditions. We need all this, and the report includes important ideas on how to make it happen. The Alliance partnered with BC because we value engagement with and among First Nations on these issues. The report supports the further need for more discussion and engagement. LNG development is not going to happen on its own. It takes a co-operative partnership of industry and First Nations, and with support from government. The engagement sessions supported by the BC ministry have helped show how First Nations are on board with responsible development.The full report can be read below.last_img read more

Firefighters Ball raises over 65000

first_imgWinn added that the atmosphere was extra special this year, especially since the firefighters began their charitable society in 2016 to help residents with travel medical expenses. He added that the vast majority of the money raised will be staying in the local area. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The 10th Annual Fort St. John Firefighters Charity Ball brought in an estimated $65,000 after expenses on Saturday night.Firefighters Charitable Society President Adam Winn said that though the final exact tally isn’t in yet, but that at least $65,000 was raised for two causes at the event, after the ball grossed around $111,000. Winn said that the ball was raising money for the local firefighters charity that supports Fort St. John residents cover travel expenses for medical treatment outside the Peace Region. The ball also raised money for the Firefighters Burn Fund.Winn said that the he was stunned at the amount of money the sold-out event raised, especially considering that the local economy has not quite recovered to levels seen five years ago. For the tenth anniversary celebrations, Winn said that firefighters aimed to make the event more lively than in years past, with live music from CC Brooks and the Roadside Distraction and the Montney Coulees making live music a debut at the ball.last_img read more