Shawsheen Tech Makes Significant Upgrades To School Security Systems

first_imgBILLERICA, MA — On Wednesday, October 24, 2018, Shawsheen Valley Technical High School welcomed community safety officials and State Representative Marc Lombardo to review and demonstrate the school’s updated security systems and recently-constructed Crisis Command Center.Superintendent-Director Timothy Broadrick and the District School Committee have been engaged in a three-year campus security project to bring the 49-year-old Shawsheen Technical High School building and grounds into the cutting edge of school security.  According to Superintendent Broadrick, “One of the challenges of an aging facility is making the right kinds of thoughtful investments that preserve the usefulness and longevity of the structures.  Our School Committee and our five member communities understand this, and they have annually supported a capital plan that keeps this place in great shape.”State Representative Marc Lombardo has been a champion of public safety as well as all forms of public education in Billerica, both in the Billerica Public School System and at Shawsheen Tech.  When he heard about the Shawsheen District’s plans from the Superintendent, he committed to lending a hand.  As a result, Representative Lombardo introduced a FY19 state budget line item for $50,000 to support the school’s efforts.  Shawsheen Tech is using the additional support to integrate a software system – Sielox Class – in a dedicated crisis management facility that will enable school officials as well as the Billerica Police department to respond to a variety of different kinds of emergencies in real time.Principal Jessica Cook and the high school’s Crisis Team have been working with the District’s security contractor and the Billerica Police to design protocols for a variety of potential safety threat situations. “It’s certainly a shame that educators have to spend time thinking about some of these things,” said Cook, “but, our students and staff have to feel safe in order for quality teaching and learning to occur.”The system will link the school to the Billerica Police department to allow instant notification when a “lockdown” or other crisis response occurs.  Additionally, Cook says that the system can link to parent notification systems and the school’s website to make public announcements when necessary.  Cook and her team have also been focused on the constant evaluation and growth of the school’s safety and security protocols to ensure and provide a safe and supportive learning environment.  Staff at the school have begun training on enhanced crisis response routines, which will soon include student drills, after communication with parents and additional staff training.  Says Cook, “Some of these changes feel overdue, but every school is racing to ensure its students are as safe as possible.  We are taking steps to not only catch up with the times, but to be on the leading edge of this kind of work.  This Crisis Command Center will be an invaluable resource to us.”Superintendent Timothy Broadrick, Representative Marc Lombardo, Isabel Fiasconaro, Grace Clark, Muhammadali Khalifa, Brian West Billerica PD/Shawsheen SRO, Jorielle Arlock, Billerica Police Chief Dan Rosa, Andre Comeau, Roy Frost, Deputy Chief Billerica Police Department, Principal Jessica CookRepresentative Marc Lombardo and Billerica Police Chief Dan Rosa speaking with Shawsheen Tech students about safety, security, and government(NOTE: The above press release is from the Shawsheen Tech.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedShawsheen Tech Superintendent Tim Broadrick To Step Down Mid-YearIn “Education”PHOTO: Shawsheen Tech Plays First Ever Baseball Game Under The Lights At Alumni StadiumIn “Photo of the Day”Shawsheen Tech School Committee Calls For School Boards Across The Country To Unite & Lobby For ‘Sane’ Gun LawsIn “Education”last_img read more

Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible

first_img More information: W. J. Munro, et al. “Quantum communication without the necessity of quantum memories.” Nature Photonics DOI: 10.1038/NPHOTON.2012.243 Illustration of the new quantum communication scheme, where information is directly transmitted from one node to another using a transmitter unit and a receiver unit. The scientists calculated that the new approach could potentially enable communication rates several orders of magnitude faster than other approaches. Credit: W. J. Munro, et al. ©2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited In such a system, the performance is inherently limited by the time it takes to establish entanglement between nodes. This time is at best the classical signaling time between the nodes, but with many schemes it is even longer, and increases as network size increases. Since the qubits that store the quantum information are unstable and quickly decohere, quantum memories are required to store quantum information for milliseconds or longer while they wait for entanglement. The result is a theoretical limitation on speed due to the system’s design and the need for additional components – quantum memories – to enable a functioning network.In a new study published in Nature Photonics, scientists from Japan and the UK have presented an alternative design for a quantum communication network that requires neither entanglement between nodes nor quantum memories. Instead, the scheme transmits quantum information in encoded form directly across the network, using devices that act as quantum repeaters (without entanglement) to transmit and receive information between each other. Because this approach doesn’t use entanglement, the communications rate is not limited by the conventional restraints that limit the rates of entanglement-based approaches.”The significance of this work is that we have removed the need for classical messages to herald the generation of entanglement between adjacent nodes,” coauthor Bill Munro of NTT Basic Research Laboratories in Kanagawa, Japan, and the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo, Japan, told Phys.org. “This classical signal means our qubits at the remote nodes had to wait until it could be found out whether they were entangled or not. With repeater nodes separated by tens of kilometers, this waiting time was on the order of hundreds of microseconds. This means we needed long-lived quantum memories (milliseconds or longer life times) to store the information (entanglement) that was in those qubits. Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible (2012, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-quantum-entanglement-faster-previously-thought.html In order to build a quantum internet – a network that is faster and more secure than the current internet – the key is the ability to transmit quantum information between remote quantum computers (i.e., nodes). The most familiar approach involves entangling the links between nodes and then using quantum repeaters at intermediate locations to provide entanglement swapping, extending the range of entanglement across km-long networks. Explore further Quantum networks advance with entanglement of photons, solid-state qubits This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “Our new scheme removes the need for long-lived quantum memories, as we do not aim to establish entanglement between the remote nodes. Instead we send an encoded signal between the nodes. Once the message has left one node to be transmitted to the next node, the resources available in the first node are freed up and the next message can be sent down the channel (even before the second node has received the first message), thus increasing the rate at which information can be transmitted. Entanglement-based approaches cannot do this, so their only route to higher communication rates is by paralleling resources within the node.”In the new approach, information is stored in matter qubits, such as electron spins, in the transmitter and receiver units. The transmitter, which contains a single-photon source, transfers the information from the matter qubits to the photonic qubits. Then it sends the photonic qubits down an optical fiber to the receiver, which contains a single-photon detector. The receiver operates in reverse, transferring the information from the photonic qubits back to matter qubits. Unlike traditional schemes, the new scheme doesn’t require entanglement between the matter qubits at the two remote nodes. As soon as the transmitter moves the information from the matter qubit to the photonic qubit, the matter qubit is no longer needed, so quantum memory is not required to store its information. After the completion of one cycle, the final matter qubit is checked for errors using a redundant quantum parity code. Since channel losses and source/detector inefficiencies are inevitable, quantum states can easily be degraded during quantum communication. The error correction code protects against this degradation by measuring the states of several matter qubits that all carry the same information. The physicists showed that this encoding process can tolerate photon loss in excess of 50% in the quantum channel between nodes, which allows for nodes to be spaced further apart than usually thought.After the error correction code verifies successful transmission of a qubit, the receiver then acts as a transmitter and sends the information on to the next node in the network. The scientists calculated that the scheme could transmit data at a rate of 107 quantum states per second, and operate over a distance of at least 17 km between nodes. With 48 nodes, quantum information could be transmitted over 800 km with a success probability of greater than 98%. The scientists calculated that the new approach could potentially enable communication rates several orders of magnitude faster than other approaches. In addition to speed, the new scheme also has other routing advantages.”Our solution also makes it very easy to see how one can send information on a more complicated quantum network,” Munro said. “Each node would have a telephone-like number and then we can think of telephone-like exchanges that route the information to where it needs to go. The node that sends the original message does not need to know the route to the final destination. Instead it just needs to get to a local exchange which can route it through the chain using country, region, and city parts of the telephone-like number.”In the future, the researchers plan to tackle some of the technical challenges facing the new quantum communication scheme.”Our future plans are an experimental implementation of this approach,” Munro said. “Currently we are working on ways to improve our local gates within our physical system – a necessary step to showing our new communication scheme.”The key requirement in this new approach is the need for efficient quantum gates within the repeater node,” he added. “In the normal entanglement-based approach, we can work with gates that fail a lot of the time in a heralded way. Currently, efficient quantum gates are experimentally challenging to achieve but they need to be achieved if distributed quantum computers are going to be achieved.” Journal information: Nature Photonicslast_img read more