How Doubledown DoubleDipped

first_imgEarlier this week, FOLIO: reported that Doubledown Media, the publisher of magazines aimed at the Wall Street elite, has ceased operations. This morning, as I was scanning the newsstand, I came across a couple remnants of the once-rising enterprise—and was seeing double. Literally.Side-by-side, the November/December issue of Doubledown’s Trader Monthly and the December/January issue of Dealmaker are nearly identical. The cover subjects—Dean Smith and Wray Thorn, respectively—are posed and photographed the same way. The coverlines are near mirror images of each other.Flipping through, I found—wait, yes—identical feature stories. Word for word. Page for page. With little in the way of design changes. Admittedly, I was not a subscriber to Doubledown’s magazines, so I don’t know if this happened often or was an isolated incident. While I understand that Trader Monthly and Dealmaker had similar readerships (and advertisers) there is no excuse for such blatant, lazy sharing of copy.last_img read more

Google takes aim at imposter websites with new Chrome warning

first_img Tags 12 Comments Share your voice Security It’s hard to be sure where you are on the internet these days. Carefully checking the URL is one approach to avoiding danger. Trouble is, many fraudulent websites use tricks to make their URLs look like the real deal. Now, Google wants to call them out.To do that, the company is developing a new warning in its Chrome browser that appears when you’re visiting a site that’s mimicking a well-known web page. The warning could ask you, for example, if you actually meant to go to “paypal.com” when you were headed to a lookalike scam site called “paypa1.com” instead.The warning is intended to take the pressure off you to notice when something’s wrong with the URL. That’s important because most people don’t notice when they’re headed off to a scam site, Google Chrome engineer Emily Stark said in a talk on Tuesday at the Enigma Conference, a security and privacy event. “What people are seeing in the URL bar really just isn’t helpful to them as a security mechanism,” Stark said.The warning could help make it harder to carry out on one of the most pervasive and effective hacking attacks out there — phishing. If users heed Chrome warnings, it could save them from entering usernames, passwords or credit card information into websites controlled by criminals. It could also keep them from downloading malicious software at scam websites that could do things like encrypt their data and demand a ransom.Scammy websites use a number of tricks to look legitimate in that URL field at the top of your web browser. They might use a slight misspelling, or swap out the number one for a lowercase letter L to look like a legitimate website. The latter is called a homograph attack, and it’s powerful because it usually involves characters that the untrained eye will miss. The new warning, which is still being tested, alerts users to the fact that they aren’t heading to a popular website or a website they’ve engaged with in the past. If the user wants to keep going in that direction, they can click “ignore.” Stark said her team wanted to throw up a flag for users without overselling the danger.”We designed this warning to be informational rather than scary,” she said. The talk follows comments Chrome security experts made in September about security problems involving URLs. At the time, Google said its engineers were researching how to make changes to the way Chrome handles URLs in order to improve safety. On Tuesday, Stark said changes Google and other software developers propose should be “incremental.” Still, no idea is too crazy to at least consider, she said.”Website identity is so, so broken that all ideas should be on the table,” Stark said. Hacking Privacylast_img read more

B Chy suffers mild stroke

first_imgAQM Badruddoza Chowdhury. File PhotoBikalpa Dhara Bangladesh (BDB) president AQM Badruddoza Chowdhury suffered a mild stroke early Friday, reports UNB.“Badruddoza Chowdhury suffered a minor stroke and he was advised to take a two-week full bed rest by his daughter and personal physician Shaila Sharmin Chowdhury,” said B Chowdhury’s press secretary Jahangir Alam.The BDB chief is now under best rest at his residence under the supervision of Shaila Sharmin, he said.Badruddoza Chowdhury urged the countrymen to pray for his early recovery, Jahangir Alam added.last_img

Mozilla optimizes calls between JavaScript and WebAssembly in Firefox making it almost

first_imgYesterday, Mozilla announced that in the latest version of Firefox Beta, calls between JS and WebAssembly are faster than non-inlined JS to JS function calls. They have made these optimizations keeping two aspects of engine’s work in mind: reducing bookkeeping and cutting out intermediaries. How they made WebAssembly function calls faster They have optimized the calls in both directions, that is, from JavaScript to WebAssembly and WebAssembly to JavaScript with their recent work in Firefox. All these optimizations have been done to make the engine’s work easier. The improvements fall into two groups: Reducing bookkeeping: This means getting rid of unnecessary work to organize stack frames Cutting out intermediaries: This means taking the most direct path between functions How they optimized WebAssembly to JavaScript calls The browser engine has to deal with two different kinds of languages while going through your code even if the code is all written in JavaScript: bytecode and machine code. The engine needs to be able to go back and forth between these two languages. When it does these jumps, it needs to have some information in place, like the place from where it needs to resume. The engine also must separate the frames that it needs. To organize its work, the engine gets a folder and puts this information in it. When the Firefox developers first added WebAssembly support, they had a different type of folder for it. So even though JIT-ed JavaScript code and WebAssembly code were both compiled and speaking machine language, it was treated as if they were speaking different languages. This was unnecessarily costly in two ways: An unnecessary folder is created which adds up setup and teardown costs It requires trampolining through C++ to create the folder and do other setup They fixed this by generalizing the code to use the same folder for both JIT-ed JavaScript and WebAssembly. This made calls from WebAssembly to JS almost as fast as JS to JS calls. How they optimized JavaScript to WebAssembly calls JavaScript and WebAssembly use different customs even if they are speaking the same language. For instance, to handle dynamic types, JavaScript uses something called boxing. As JavaScript doesn’t have explicit types, they need to be figured out at runtime. To keep track of the types of values, the engine attaches a tag to the value. This turns one simple operation into four operations. This is the reason why WebAssembly expects parameters to be unboxed and doesn’t box its return values. Since it is statically typed, it doesn’t need to add this overhead. So, before the engine gives the parameters to the WebAssembly function, the engine needs to unbox the values and put them in registers. It has to go through C++ again to prepare the values when going from JS to WebAssembly. Going to this intermediary step is a huge cost, especially for something that’s not that complicated. To solve this, they took the code that C++ was running and made it directly callable from JIT code. So, when the engine goes from JavaScript to WebAssembly, the entry stub unboxes the values and places them in the right place. Along with these calls, they have also optimized monomorphic and built-in calls. To understand the optimizations well, check out Lin Clark’s official announcement on Mozilla’s website. Read Next Mozilla updates Firefox Focus for mobile with new features, revamped design, and Geckoview for Android Mozilla releases Firefox 62.0 with better scrolling on Android, a dark theme on macOS, and more Mozilla, Internet Society, and web foundation wants G20 to address “techlash” fuelled by security and privacy concernslast_img read more