Nikolaevsk man dead and one Alaska State Trooper injured after officerinvolved shooting

first_imgA Nikolaevsk man is dead and an Alaska State Trooper sustained serious injuries after an officer-involved shooting Saturday evening. Troopers say 42-year-old Nikolai Yakunin was shot after he assaulted an officer, but it’s unclear how the altercation happened and if Yakunin was armed.Listen nowTroopers in Anchor Point received a report that 42-year-old Nikolai Yakunin was in contact with a female who he was prohibited from speaking to under his probation conditions.Troopers received the report at 2:17 p.m. Saturday afternoon and responded to Yakunin’s residence off Nikolaevsk Road on the south side of the small village of 350 people about five hours later at 7:07 p.m.Yakunin’s father, also named Nikolai, was leading services at the local church when he says his wife told him about the shooting.“I went out and she said our son had been shot, possibly killed, and she was crying,” Yakunin said.Yakunin says he went to the house where troopers confirmed his son was dead on the scene. He says troopers have not disclosed any more information to him or his family.“It’d be nice to find out what really happened with the trooper going into Nick’s house and getting into a fight with Nick or Nick getting into a fight with the trooper,” Yakunin said.Yakunin says he does not think his son had any firearms. He also says the community is disappointed with the trooper’s use of force, and says it was police brutality.“Is this the practice of the troopers? We know he was not armed,” Yakunin said. “He might have had some, a pipe or something, but other than that he had no firearm, but he was just taken down.”According to a trooper dispatch, the responding trooper was incapacitated after Yakunin attacked him and additional troopers were dispatched for backup. Troopers say Yakunin continued his “assaultive behavior, and he was shot to prevent further assaults on anyTrooper or bystander.”According to court records, Yakunin has been indicted on several assault charges dating back to late 2013, including a charge for threatening to hit troopers with a metalpipe in May of last year.The release does not say how Yakunin attacked the responding officer, and that the trooper was transported to South Peninsula Hospital in Homer with serious injuries.Troopers spokesperson Tim DeSpain said the trooper was still hospitalized late Monday afternoon.The trooper who shot and killed Yakunin has not been named and has been placed on standard 72-hour administrative leave. Troopers say the investigation is ongoing.Yakunin’s funeral is planned later this week.last_img read more

New TB drug inaccessible to many South Africans

first_imgOnly 3,000 patients worldwide have been treated with bedaquiline, and fewer than 200 with delamanid – only 2% of the 150,000 people around the world that could benefit.“MSF is treating some of the lucky few people in South Africa — and in fact the whole world – to receive access to strengthened treatment regimens including bedaquiline and delamanid,” said Dr. Jennifer Hughes of MSF in South Africa. “South Africa’s Department of Health has been a leader in accessing new DR-TB drugs, with over 1,750 patients receiving bedaquiline nationally since 2013.Ubuntu clinic (integrated TB/HIV) in Khayelitsha.Patients receiving bedaquiline in South Africa had 77% ‘culture conversion’ rates from TB-positive to negative, which is a promising sign that their treatment may ultimately be successful. Additional information from South Africa showed similar safety and efficacy even when bedaquiline was given together with antiretroviral therapy (ART) to TB/HIV co-infected people, another sign that this drug has the potential to transform DR-TB treatment in coming years.Delamanid, however, is not yet as widely available in South Africa.“TB is curable, yet it is now the infectious disease that kills the most people in the world,” said Dr. Grania Brigden, TB Advisor for the MSF Access Campaign. “We desperately need treatment that is easier for people to tolerate, that cures more people, and that is more available and affordable, otherwise it’s just deadly business as usual.” *Article supplied by Doctors Without Borders (MSF). Follow them on Facebook and Twitter for more groundbreaking initiatives. Doctors Without Borders (MSF), other treatment providers in South Africa and globally have found that the first new drugs in half a century to be developed for treating drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) are offering new hope to patients — but significant challenges remain to improve availability and affordability of these treatments.Current treatment regimens for DR-TB involve thousands of pills taken over two years, which can have devastating side effects and ultimately only work for 50% of people with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and 26% of people with extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.Access to new drugs bedaquiline and delamanid along with ‘repurposed’ drugs — not specifically developed for TB but that have shown efficacy in treating TB — could be a significant step toward finding a shorter, more tolerable DR-TB regimen in the future.This is good news for South Africa, which has one of the highest burdens of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in the world, with 30,000 new cases each year, over 18,000 people diagnosed and over 11,500 put on treatment in 2014.center_img WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite last_img read more