French Green Goblin will try to fly from France to England again

first_img Share your voice 🇫🇷🇬🇧 HAPPENING NOW: “Flyboard” creator Franky Zapata lifts off from Calais, France to cross the English Channel @frankyzapata #flyboardair pic.twitter.com/j3l96lURa3— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) July 25, 2019 4 Comments Marvel Spiderman Culture Sport and Outdoors take that, green goblin https://t.co/YnAL2efT9i— Marty (@MartyDaxnger) July 25, 2019 Tags On Tuesday, Zapata’s team told AFP they’ll try to avoid repeating the mistake on Sunday by using a bigger boat stationed in French waters for refueling. France’s authorities wouldn’t allow that for last Thursday’s attempt.Last week’s attempt was timed to mark the 110th anniversary of the first aerial crossing of the channel. Louis Bleriot’s 1909 trip took 37 minutes.Unsurprisingly, the internet continued its comparisons to the Marvel Comics villain.  Zapata’s company website notes that the Flyboard Air isn’t available for recreational use and would require 100 hours of training on its water variant if it were. So you can’t become Green Goblin anytime soon. It’ll probably take at least two sequels.First published July 25 at 2:51 a.m. PT.Updated July 31 at 4:55 a.m. PT: Adds that Zapata will try again on Sunday. We’ll meet again, Spider-Man. On Sunday, as it turns out. Jack Chan/Xinhua via Getty Franky Zapata, the French inventor who looked a whole lot like Spider-Man archnemesis Green Goblin as he flew a hoverboard through Paris during June’s Bastille Day celebrations, took an unsuccessful first shot at flying across the English Channel last Thursday, and he’ll try again this Sunday.In his previous attempt, he took off near Calais, France, on his invention — the turbine engine-powered Flyboard Air — and flew across the channel toward St. Margaret’s Bay in Dover, England. He planned to make the 22-mile journey in around 20 minutes, with a quick stop on a boat to refill his power pack with kerosene, the Associated Press noted.Unfortunately, he fell into the water when he tried to land on a boat for refueling. His wife, Christelle, told the AP that the waves moved the landing platform too much. Zapata wasn’t injured in the fall, and French divers rescued him quickly. last_img read more

Heres How Translators Are Helping Harvey Evacuees

first_img Share KUTJose Guerrero walks around with his parrot at the Delco Center for Harvey evacuees in Austin.Thousands of people are finding their way to dry blankets and warm socks in shelters all across Texas. Dallas expects to host as many as 10,000 people fleeing Harvey; in Austin, as many as 7,000. Donations keep trickling in.But there’s one big need that’s still out there: multi-lingual volunteers.Walking into the Delco Center – one of Austin’s shelters for Harvey evacuees – you might remember that Houston was recently dubbed the most diverse city in America. A little less than half the people there speak a language other than English.Many are bilingual like much the rest of Texas. But not all.“I would certainly encourage [people] out there, if they are bilingual or trilingual, to certainly volunteer,” says Geof Sloan of the Red Cross.Tuesday morning there were no Spanish-speaking volunteers at the shelter. But, Sloan says, one of the evacuees from Freeport rose to the challenge.“Anything I can do to help, just let me know,” says Maria Villagomez. “You also need a lot of help, and helping each other is a great idea.”Also at the shelter was Jose Guerrero. Walking around with the family’s yellow- and-green parrot on his shoulder, he was hard to miss.At the time, he was on the phone with his sisters. They were still trapped in Richmond, Texas.Guerrero says leaving Richmond in the middle of a disaster – and finding answers to his questions when he doesn’t speak English – has been tough.Forty-seven-year-old Guerrero was born in Mexico and has been in the U.S. since he was 15. He’s been here much longer than he ever was in his home country. He’s a naturalized American, but he’s never been able to learn how to speak English.“I’m a little mad with myself that I don’t speak English,” he says in Spanish. “I don’t know what to tell you. Have I been lazy to learn? I’m a gardener. Have I worked too much and haven’t had time to go to school? I just don’t know.”Later that day, a bilingual volunteer arrived at the shelter. Maribel Canizales does IT work for the state comptroller’s office, but took the week off to work for the Red Cross.Immediately after she arrived, a family of Spanish speakers showed up. The mother asked if there were any showers available and Canizales walked the family to the showers, asking what else they needed: Shampoo? Socks?The adults were clearly shaken. As Canizales led them through the center, she casually put her arms around the mom.So what does it means to someone when somebody speaks their language? “There’s a connection … it makes them feel at home,” Canizales says, crying. “I want those people to feel at home, comfortable and welcomed.”Canizales is originally from Laredo. She gets emotional because, as a child, she was told not to speak Spanish.“When I came to Austin, it was very segregated back in the 70’s,” she says. “We were not very welcomed with our language, and so we were encouraged to speak English. And so, I kept up on the side with my native language, Spanish.”Today, anyone who’s been keeping up with a language other than English is encouraged to fill out a volunteer application and complete the training for the Red Cross. People who speak languages from India, Europe and Asia are needed too.Copyright 2017 KUT 90.5. To see more, visit KUT 90.5.last_img read more